Closure

Bridgeport brewing is big enough news that even people outside of Portland may have heard about it’s closure.

I can’t say I’m terribly surprised; murmurs get around the scene and Bridgeport had undergone at least two rebranding efforts to make their product more visually appealing. One rebrand isn’t unusual, more than that and one can’t help but wonder if everyething is OK.

The beers were solid though; stable mass market beers that you could bring to a party and not feel bad about, or that you might be excluding someone. They were always good, even if they were rarely great.

But as the Beervana blog pointed out, there seemed to be a lot of “Now that the dog has caught the car, what does it do with it?” Once they were owned by a company that didn’t seem to understand what it had or where to take it, Bridgeport didn’t branch off well; the only beer people talk about is the IPA, even though it is often spoken of in the past tense. “I used to love it,” I read or heard more than once. Yet, I thought they made other good beers too and went out of my way to try some, however one truth remains: The market is brutal and a lot of beer is out there.

I mean, Rogue still exists, FFS. ROGUE. A brewery that these days is known for making beer from the yeast found in the head brewer’s beard, and a shitty attitude towards its employees, than making a good product.

So it’s a bummer to see Bridgeport go, for certain.

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Whatever You Say 53/Second Pint PRM

I walked to the Zoiglhaus tonight. I’m meeting friends and hoping to get there early so I can write a bit and I have succeeded. But the walk here was akin to wandering through a Mad Max territory, replacing winter for desert.

Portland does not do snow very well. It’s understandable; they haven’t had to until ’12, really, but now it seems like there’s at least one bad winter storm a year and the temps get downright chilly.

It has an effect on my brain, too; I go out walking during these conditions and I start to get very neo-noir detective, a not quite as tough character from a James Ellroy novel. “Empty bottles skidding across the pavement in the wind, the rattle of the skittering plastic sounding like the lost hopes and dreams of once a great city…” That sort of thing.

Fortunately for everyone, rain is expected tomorrow and we should be more or less back to our normal selves then.

There’s only one man at the rail this evening, and he bears more in common with a neo-Viking than with me; military close cropped hair and a blonde beard that goes halfway down to his sternum. He’s got a couple bottles of the schwarzbeir near him and I’m hesitant because smoke beers are hit and miss, but the theme is the theme. Into the breach, my friends!

“I’m having the Doppelsticke.”

Whew. Unfortunately, the concentration I spent on coming up with bad noir metaphors meant that I forgot to take a picture of my beer. It’s a cloudy brown, like overindulgent chocolate milk, served in a snifter style glass. There isn’t much head on it, which I always feel is a dubious sign.

The Doppelsticke is not giving me much in the nose, just faint malt roast, but it’s got some weight to it, sticky, sweet, a blend of coffee and chocolate, it both feels a little hot at 8.9% and finishes with a chalky quality that I can’t get down with.

I don’t hate this but it seems like something went awry here.

Today’s second pint goes to the Portland Rescue Mission.

Mary MacLeod (Devil’s Mother) ’18

My annual imperial milk stout has come to fruition! Here’s the results:

The nose has some of the milk qualities-and this beer has a fine, sustainable head on it that keeps providing some scent long after the pour.

Devil's Mother '18There isn’t much milk in the flavor though, so I definitely  needed to add a second pound of lactic sugars to this one.

There is, however, a decent viscosity to this beer; it’s dense but not oily, rich without being too heavy. It clears off the palate nicely, leaving a strong but not sharp flavor of coffee behind.

That’s a plus; the beer not being as sharp as last year’s. I credit my buddy Jeremy for recommending Karafa malt instead of Black Patent. It’s helped improve the beer by dialing down the bitter quality. Anything that helps a beer with this alcohol volume and these kind of robust flavors needs a little nudge in the drinkability column.

And this one definitely is drinkable. There’s a harsher element, a hard coffee flavor, that isn’t tempered by any sweetness and I believe it’s this flavor that lingers. It doesn’t spoil the beer in any way, though, it just makes that initial fluffy sweetness work out better.

Brew date: 9/9/18

Steeping malts
2 lb Chocolate
.5 lb Carafe 3
5 lb Maris Otter
2 lb Opal 44
1 lb Golden Promise
2 oz cocoa nibs

Fermentables: 7 lb LME

Other: 1 lb Lactose

Hops: 1 oz Nugget @ 60

Yeast: Imperial Barbarian 4th use (d’oh! I really try to only use yeast three times, in order to keep the flavor profile stable)

OG: 1.10

FG: 1.022

Bottled 10/22

ABV: 10.6%

Whatever You Say 52/Second Pint AIRP

Cranberrry hibiscus ciderLast week local cider maker Cider Riot, along with a nearby union had their business vandalized, most likely by right wing dildos trying to ‘make a statement’. Which means it’s a perfect time to go down to Cider Riot and give them some of my money.

A woman on the rail is having the , cranberry hibiscus cider so here we go! The color on this is just beautiful: I love this shade of red. As for the drink itself, it definitely has an herbal nose; the presence isn’t at all shy. The tartness of the cranberry takes over the rest of the cider, though, which works but I wish the finish was a little more sparkly.  It doesn’t dance off my palate very well so I’m not encouraged to have a second.

But that’s OK: there are other ciders to try and I’d certainly like another.

Today’s second pint goes to the American Immigration Representation Project.