Whatever You Say 49/Second Pint OCADSV

It’s bouncing at the Hourglass when I walk in-I’m not even sure if I can stay here, but the place is only near standing room and I’m able to make it work.

A man on the rail is watching the football game with his friend, but is able to tell me that he’s drinking a Boneyard IPA. I order it and the bartender fills the glass to the rim, so I already know what kind of place this is. It’s always dive bars that give you the pours that are that full, from years of neighborhood patrons that you want to treat right. You want to give them a little extra, a reason to come back.

I find a table nearby and sip my beer.

Boneyard IPABoneyard’s IPA is well known; scents of melon and citrus, with a sweet, malt body that paves the way for a finish that starts with melon again-honeydew, I think-that leads to a bitterness which is potent, but not intense.

As always, Boneyard makes some delightful IPAs to drink.

However, it’s pretty damn hard to pull the flavors from this beer, and here’s why: the scent of fried chicken is the most delicious fog I have ever encountered in a place. It’s salty, spicy and I can practically smell the crispiness.

Whatever else is going on here, I suddenly want to eat.

That isn’t all that’s going on, though: the Hourglass is clearly a local place, people crowding tables, talking in groups of multiples, shooting pool, getting dinner, having a good night. If l lived within walking distance, I have no doubt I’d find myself here frequently.

This week’s second pint goes to the Oregon Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence.

The Porter Dream

Marijuana porterThis beer has a nose of chocolate and marijuana. The chocolate is closer to coco powder-dry, sidling up to bitterness but not quite there. A little sweetness, even but that seems to be cut off by the marijuana.

The flavors follow this pattern, too. There is, I think, a little more sweetness in the taste than in the nose, which is nice. Again, though, the marijuana cuts through the beer on the finish. However, the marijuana isn’t the finish on this beer, which is great.

There’s a dry cocoa quality that re-introduces itself and keeps everything in check.

I should’ve been doing things this way long ago; contrasts instead of competition. Every good chef knows that, and lord knows I’ve been taught enough times.

On the upside, though: now I have a path forward!

 

Brew date: 9/16/19

Steeping grains
.5 lb Chocolate
.5 lb black barley
.25 lb black patent
2 oz cocca nibs
1 cup toasted oats

Fermentables: 7 lb Light malt extract

Water additions: 1/2 tsp Gypsum

Hops
1 oz Nugget
3 oz Pale Blue Dream (marijuana strain)

Yeast: Imperial Darkness

OG: 1.06

FG: 1.018

Bottled 10/6

ABV: 5.7%

The New Keg

This article on the new use of plastic kegs brings up complicated things for me.

On the upside, the beer lasts longer. That’s not something that I feel should be easily dismissed, alongside the benefits of reduced weight for easier shipping, and less fuel being used to get product to market.

The downside is that plastics just aren’t as renewable as metal is. While the company claims that these new kegs are recyclable, I can’t help but feel dubious.

Still, it’s a pretty interesting innovation and if the net benefit is positive, then that’s pretty cool.