What Can You Buy There #3: 33 Brewing Experiment; Brett Pale Ale with Apricot

(Ed. note: I hit publish on this yesterday, but it’s supposed to be up today. Enjoy!)

Hello! It’s Fuz again. Our host has asked me to contribute to this blog every now and then, something I’m happy to do.

The original remit of this series was to expose readers to things I can find in my local liquor shop, but I’m gladly breaking the pattern for this entry.

One of my favourite breweries in Vancouver, 33 Acres, has opened up an experimental brewery (33 Experiment) right next door to their current shop. They share a wall, but customers can’t simply pass through from one to the other.¬†33 Acres has their main line-up dialed in; this new space allows them to try new things. And boy, have they taken advantage of this freedom.

It’s a strategy I wish more breweries could pursue: lock in a few key styles, ensure a constant supply of those styles, then use another space to make new things. In this way, you satisfy your regulars (who come in for X, and want X, and expect you to have X), while welcoming in those wanderers who come for something new.

img_1634I ventured there with two friends the other night to kill some time and try a flight.

(Pictured from top left-bottom left): The Hazy Pilsner (meh), the Belgian Table Biere (decent), and the Brett Pale Ale with Apricot.

(Pictured from top right-bottom right): Sea Salt IPA (surprisingly good), and the Dry Hopped Brett IPA (decent).

While I was very impressed with the Sea Salt IPA, I chose to get a growler fill of the Brett Pale Ale with Apricot. On tap, I found it pleasantly yet aggressively funky, with the barnyard hay coming through in a winning fashion, and the fruitiness of the apricot rounding out the flavour notes and providing a nice sweetness. While one of my party was less convinced (she did not appreciate tasting notes that involved the word “manure”), the rest of us thought it a real winner.

img_1638

The beer even holds up after a couple of days in the growler. If the funk is less, it’s still there, and the drying and sweet elements come through. Also, it photographs well.

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