The Impact of Dry Hopping

I, like most other homebrewers, have been told that to make a good IPA and sometimes even a good pale ale, dry hopping is a necessary step because it offers the nose that the style is looking for. However, doing so just adds aroma, not bittering qualities so we didn’t have to worry about making the beer less palatable on the back end.

Or so we were told.

But Jeff Alworth differs on this and tells us why here. There’s science and everything!

Now, the impact of dry hopping in Jeff’s article applies a little more to commercial breweries but clearly has ramifications for homebrewers who are throwing as many hops as the wort can take. It also means that there’s a space for research into how dry hopping impacts a beer and what flavors may be produced that might be considered undesirable or even beneficial.

Sure, it leaves me with more questions than answers but at least these things are interesting!

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One thought on “The Impact of Dry Hopping”

  1. Very interesting. The science seems solid. You may not pull out as much as you would in the boil, but if it’s soluble you’re going to get *something*. As dry hop levels get extreme (5lb per barrel and up) that *something* becomes noticeable. I follow Jeff but missed this one when it was released, thanks for the link!

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